The Christmas tree is sometimes explained as a Christianization of pagan tradition and ritual surrounding the winter solstice, which included the use of evergreen boughs, and an adaptation of pagan tree worship.[6] The English-language phrase "Christmas tree" is first recorded in 1835[7] and represents an importation from the German language. The modern Christmas tree tradition, though, is believed to have begun in Germany in the 18th century[6] though many argue that Martin Luther began the tradition in the 16th century.[8][9] From Germany the custom was introduced to England, first via Queen Charlotte, wife of George III, and then more successfully by Prince Albert during the early reign of Queen Victoria. The influential 1840s image of the Queen's decorated evergreen was republished in the U.S, and as the first widely circulated picture of a decorated Christmas tree in America, the custom there spread.[10] Christmas trees may be decorated with lights and ornaments.
For decades trees, wreaths and rooflines have displayed Christmas lights to the de-light-ment of family members and neighbors alike! Transform your home for seasons to come with this virtually indestructible set of 50 energy efficient blue C6 size LED lights that use up to 98% less energy than traditional incandescent lights. Light set features include:
Add a touch of Christmas décor to your residence this year. Bronner's is your stop for outdoor Christmas lights and holiday decorations. Decorate your front yard, back yard, rooftop or porch, dog house, cat house, etc. with Bronner’s selection of outdoor Christmas decorations. Choose from Airblown Inflatables, lighted plastic items or blowmolds, rope lighting ornamentals, holographic figures, lighted shapes and spheres, LED lights, and more. From C7 bulbs to C9 bases and cords, to miniature lights and twinkle bulbs, and lighted yard decorations, Bronner's is your source for Christmas lights year-round.
Deciduous trees and posts are tempting targets for candy cane spirals of light. Get lights that are closely spaced, such as mini lights or rope lights. On trees, the bark is usually rough enough to hold light strings in place. You can give light strings a little support with strategically placed pushpins, but don’t drive in a bunch of screws or nails, as you could hurt the tree.
Draped over doorways and wrapped around hand rails, garlands and wreaths pull together your holiday decorations and add a touch of warmth to your home's inside and outside spaces. Garland ranges from simple greenery to fully decorated pieces adorned with pinecones, candy canes, holly and sugared fruit. You can even wrap garland with lights for a bit of sparkle. Try single strands of garland across the mantel or tabletops. Deck the front porch railings with tinsel garlands and ribbons. Turn your front door into a festive work of art by hanging thick garland across the top of the frame. Pair it with a coordinating wreath to complete the look.
This Reindeer Pulling Sleigh Lighted Display with reindeer is made with acrylic material that is strong and durable to provide many years of enjoyment. It is lit with 70 warm white low voltage LED lights that make this holiday display sparkle. Both reindeer and sleigh feature a decorative red bow. This seasonal trimming can be displayed in indoor or outdoor locations.
Your source of power should come from a ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) outlet. This type of outlet will shut the circuit down if there is over-current. We want your lights to shine, not sparks to fly! If you don't have a GFCI outlet, a qualified electrician can permanently install one outdoors for holiday seasons to come. Or, you can buy a portable outdoor unit from your local home store for less than $20.
Tired of downsizing? Throw political correctness to the wind with giant-size outdoor ornaments for your eaves, porch and trees. Up to 4 feet tall and featuring a high-gloss finish, unbreakable plastic and poly-resin ornaments mimic glass in Paul Bunyonesque proportions. Some have built-in lights. Lots of styles and colors are available for $100 to $150.
“I can’t believe how bright these tiny little lights are. I initially bought them for my kids’ room because their Christmas lights burned out. I wanted just enough light to help them sleep at night without being scared. As beautiful as these are, they were too bright for bedroom night-lights. They lit up the whole room. They were so pretty, though! I got the multicolored ones. I am going to use these inside during Christmas instead. The wire makes it so easy to wrap around anything. Great buy!”
“These lights are wonderful! My initial idea was regular holiday tree lights, but they were too bulky and heavy, so I found these. They are lightweight, beautifully lit, and just great with the remote control for power and display options. They are so thin and light, they are invisible in the canopy. The perfect backlight for a tween on her iPad. Love ‘em! And the price is very reasonable.” [Editor’s note: We’ve written about these excellent Christmas lights before. Read more here.]
In the United Kingdom, electrically powered Christmas lights are generally known as fairy lights. In 1881, the Savoy Theatre, London was the first building in the world to be lit entirely by electricity.[10] Sir Joseph Swan, pioneer of the incandescent light bulb, supplied about 1,200 Swan incandescent lamps, and a year later, the Savoy owner Richard D'Oyly Carte equipped the principal fairies with miniature lighting supplied by the Swan United Electric Lamp Company, for the opening night of the Gilbert and Sullivan opera Iolanthe on 25 November 1882.[11] The term 'fairy lights', describing 'a small coloured light used in illuminations' had already entered English:[12] its usage for a string of electrically powered Christmas lights has been common in the UK ever since.[13]
Christmas trees displayed publicly and illuminated with electric lights became popular in the early 20th century. By the mid-20th century, it became customary to display strings of electric lights along streets and on buildings; Christmas decorations detached from the Christmas tree itself. In the United States, it became popular to outline private homes with such Christmas lights in tract housing beginning in the 1960s. By the late 20th century, the custom had also been adopted in other nations, including outside the Western world, notably in Japan and Hong Kong. Throughout Christendom, Christmas lights continue to retain their symbolism of Jesus as the light of the world.[4][1]

Add a touch of Christmas décor to your residence this year. Bronner's is your stop for outdoor Christmas lights and holiday decorations. Decorate your front yard, back yard, rooftop or porch, dog house, cat house, etc. with Bronner’s selection of outdoor Christmas decorations. Choose from Airblown Inflatables, lighted plastic items or blowmolds, rope lighting ornamentals, holographic figures, lighted shapes and spheres, LED lights, and more. From C7 bulbs to C9 bases and cords, to miniature lights and twinkle bulbs, and lighted yard decorations, Bronner's is your source for Christmas lights year-round.

This Pre-Lit LED 56 Light Palm Tree is strong yet flexible branches can be posed to provide artful placement for ornaments and decorations. The green fabric leaves and brown trunk decorated for sparkling. Unique design and selected material deserves your collection. Its attractive appearance is a nice scenery when displaying in the beach, swimming pool, square, garden, leisure plaza and more. Ideal for both summer and Christmas season. It brings the Hawaii happiness.
The illuminated Christmas tree became established in the United Kingdom during Queen Victoria's reign, and through emigration spread to North America and Australia. In her journal for Christmas Eve 1832, the delighted 13-year-old princess wrote, "After dinner.. we then went into the drawing-room near the dining-room. There were two large round tables on which were placed two trees hung with lights and sugar ornaments. All the presents being placed round the trees".[9] Until the availability of inexpensive electrical power in the early twentieth century, miniature candles were commonly (and in some cultures still are) used.

Some places make huge displays of these during December, such as Callaway Gardens, Life University, and Lake Lanier Islands in the U.S. state of Georgia. In east Tennessee, the cities of Chattanooga, Sevierville, Pigeon Forge, and Gatlinburg have light sculptures up all winter. Gatlinburg also has custom ones for Valentine's Day and St. Patrick's Day, while Pigeon Forge puts flowers on its tall lampposts for spring, and for winter has a steamboat and the famous picture of U.S. Marines Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, in addition to the city's historic Old Mill.
Jump up ^ "History of Christmas Trees". History. 2015. Retrieved 5 December 2015. Germany is credited with starting the Christmas tree tradition as we now know it in the 16th century when devout Christians brought decorated trees into their homes. Some built Christmas pyramids of wood and decorated them with evergreens and candles if wood was scarce. It is a widely held belief that Martin Luther, the 16th-century Protestant reformer, first added lighted candles to a tree.
The types of lamps used in Christmas lighting also vary considerably, reflecting the diversity of modern lighting technology in general. Common lamp types are incandescent light bulbs and now light-emitting diodes (LEDs), which are being increasingly encouraged as being more energy efficient. Less common are neon lamp sets. Fluorescent lamp sets were produced for a limited time by Sylvania in the mid-1940s.[24]
Greet your guests with this adorable inflatable Mickie Greet your guests with this adorable inflatable Mickie wearing a Santa hat. Delight children and adults alike with this whimsical holiday decoration that inflates to 3.5 ft. Made of durable fabric plastic and metal this holiday inflatable includes energy-efficient LED lighting for nighttime visibility. Plug it in stake it down ...  More + Product Details Close
Christmas trees displayed publicly and illuminated with electric lights became popular in the early 20th century. By the mid-20th century, it became customary to display strings of electric lights along streets and on buildings; Christmas decorations detached from the Christmas tree itself. In the United States, it became popular to outline private homes with such Christmas lights in tract housing beginning in the 1960s. By the late 20th century, the custom had also been adopted in other nations, including outside the Western world, notably in Japan and Hong Kong. Throughout Christendom, Christmas lights continue to retain their symbolism of Jesus as the light of the world.[4][1]
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Have the Most Beautiful House on your Street this Year!